Work and travel time can take up over 75% of your working week, so what you do outside of work is really important. There are different work eras that do affect your outside-of-work life. During my 20s and 30s, I was traveling around the world, working, and playing. Those years are when you do not need to take yourself or your future goals seriously. (Well that was the case for me, my husband had his two houses by 20, but I class him as a freak.)

During the 30s and 40s, I certainly made up for my 20s folly — it was my OMG period, where there was no hours outside of work; it was all work. The office was even part of my house. I woke up and the first thing I checked was my emails. I would have a Dictaphone on while I showered, just in case I had an idea or thought, and I spent every waking hour growing my business, squeezing in raising my three kids and a needy husband. There really was not any time to even think about “What do I do outside of work?” My only release was when I would smash myself against the wall (theoretically speaking) with stress and work, and I would pack myself up and take myself to a 5-day health retreat and then come back and do it all again.

From the 40s, life got a little bit more balanced and I could start to have life outside of work. The business was a bit bigger so it could actually afford to have a management team. They were great, so I started to have some actual life without work. I started surfing, yoga and catching up with my friends — I did have to remind them of who I actually was. These days I get to walk my beautiful daughter to school, do yoga, get as much time as I can to go to the beach, and am still trying to master the ability to surf.

People will tell you it is important to have more time outside of work, but there are times that it is simply not possible IF you want to be at the the top of your game in business, sport, or anything else where you find your passion.

People also look at work as something bad and retirement is the Holy Grail, but often work is where people find their joy and passion. It is where they feel alive as they have their major spike and dramas at work. Many people are defined by what they do, and often when they retire, they are lost and then they have to work to find their next passion. It is also common, as it is with me, that life and work mould into one. There is not a time in my day that I am not thinking about my business and how we can do it better.

As you can read, my business life for a time was my personal life. It was challenging and sometimes incredibly stressful, but I was passionate about the business and loved the journey of Boost. It was not work — it was an obsession.